| Home | Faculty | School Board | Public Documents | Calendar | Course Information | Activities | Moodle | Grades Online | Tablet Program | TCP Email |

Course Descriptions

Electives, English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Performing Arts, Science, Social Studies


Social Studies

Top

IS/ALS American History A - This course is an independent study course covering American and Arizona History A. This course covers the time period from Europeans before America was discovered, through the end of the Civil War. The book Arizona: A Journey of Discovery will cover Arizona History A. Be prepared to write 48 essays and take 49 tests.

IS/ALS American History B - This course is an independent study course covering American and Arizona History B. This course covers the time period from reconstruction after the Civil War through the election of George W. Bush and Terrorism. The book Arizona: A Journey of Discovery will cover Arizona History B. Be prepared to write 47 essays and take 48 tests.

IS/ALS Civics - This course is an independent study course covering several government types and sociological systems with a focal point on the American government and society. The main sections contained in this will be an introduction to governmental and sociological systems, rights and the constitution, branches of government, state and local governments, political parties and elections, as well as policies and civil rights. The book Arizona: A Journey of Discovery will cover the governmental system in Arizona. Be prepared to write 36 essays and take 37 tests.

World History/World Geography- This course is designed to cover an overview of the history of humankind from the first civilizations and empires up to the present. Themes and concepts include politics and history, economics and history, the importance of cultural development, religion in history, the role of individuals, the impact of science and technology, the environment and history, and the role of ideas. The world geography portion of the course consistently emphasizes the five themes of geography and looks at each major region of the world, focusing on each region's physical geography, cultural geography, and what the region is like to live in today.

Economics- This course is designed to cover basic economic principles, including scarcity and choice, opportunity cost and trade-offs the cost-benefit principle, productivity, economic systems, and exchange. Key microeconomic concepts are also covered, such as supply and demand, markets and prices, elasticity, competition, distribution, and the role of government. Also discussed in the course are macroeconomic concepts, such as GDP, inflation, unemployment, supply-side and demand-side economics, and fiscal and monetary policy. The course is also designed to expose students to personal finance issues that involve making decisions about their lives. Using the key economic concepts and an economic way of thinking, students are encouraged to develop personal financial literacy as they participate in activities and practice scenarios that relate to everyday living.

Civics- Civics is designed to help students learn about government, both of the United States and Arizona. This course will help prepare them to become thoughtful, responsible participants in today's society. The course covers the foundations of the American political system, the expectations of the American citizen in our democracy, and the relationship of the United States to other nations and its role in world affairs. It also focuses on current events, civic life, politics, and government as well as the history and functions of the Constitution.

U.S. /AZ History- This course will focus on the study of the historical development of American institutions and ideas from the Age of Exploration to the present. Students will explore through a chronological survey, major issues, movements, people and events in United States and Arizona history. Students will learn how to apply concepts in civics, economics and geography through analytical skills and factual knowledge to deal critically with problems and materials in U.S. History. Students will learn how to assess historical materials, primary vs. secondary sources, weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

Honors Civics - This course is designed to help students understand the history and principles of our constitutional government. Students will explore the structure of the federal government as outlined in the U.S. Constitution and the organization of state and local government. Students will investigate the role of the free enterprise system, the importance of political participation, and their rights and responsibilities as American citizens. Students will participate in a mock congressional hearing and apply knowledge and understanding of the American legal, political and economic systems.

United States History to 1865 - (HIST2410) Dual credit 3 credit hours, college; .5 credit, high school.
This one semester course transfers as social / behavioral science to most colleges and universities. Offered in the Fall. A survey of the personalities, events, and ideas which have shaped American history from the earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War. Emphasis upon the American Revolution, the establishment of government under the Constitution, and the succeeding political, social, and economic movements that culminated in the Civil War.

United States History since 1865 - (HIST2420) Dual credit: 3credit hours, college; .5 credit, high school.
This one semester course transfers as a social / behavioral science to most colleges and universities. Offered in the Spring. A survey of the personalities, events, and ideas that have shaped American history since the Civil War. Emphasis upon Reconstruction, rise of industrial America, 20th century adjustments to prosperity, depression and world war, and the political, social, and economic changes since World War II.


Mathematics

Top

Algebra 1A - This initial course of the college preparatory mathematics program covers algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, graphing relations and functions. It also covers variation, exponents and their properties as well as polynomials.

Algebra 1B - This course expands on the concepts of Algebra IA, topics include factoring and special products, proportion and rational expressions, roots and radical expressions. It also covers quadratic equations and their graphs, basic statistics and probability.

Algebra II A - This course expands the concepts presented in Algebra I and develops a further understanding of algebraic processes. The new topics introduced include systems of inequalities, matrices, determinants, functions, polynomials and polynomial functions.

Algebra II B - This course expands the concepts presented in Algebra I and develops a further understanding of algebraic processes. The new topics i-ntroduced include quadratic equations, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants, probability and statistics, sequences and series.

Geometry A: This course covers fundamental geometric concepts, inductive and deductive reasoning. Students will learn to use proof, identify and apply congruent triangles, quadrilaterals and their properties, as well as connect proportion and similarity.

Geometry B: This course covers right triangles, their application and beginning trigonometry. Students will learn to analyze circles, explore polygons and their areas, as well as surface areas and volumes. Vectors, coordinate transformations will also be covered this semester.

Probability and Statistics - Probability and statistics is a course designed to enable students to further study topics presented in the Algebra II curriculum. It reviews basic measures of central tendency, frequency distributions, probability, permutations and combinations. Students will apply these principles as they undertake a study of the rules of probability, counting principles, variance, and sampling techniques.

Trigonometry - This course is designed to utilize the student's knowledge of algebra and geometry as they learn to apply those skills in trigonometry. Students will use these skills in solving right triangles, oblique triangles and work in trigonometric identities. This course will meet the needs of students who desire to continue their study of mathematics in calculus or other disciplines.

College Algebra - This course will focus on the study of family of functions (linear, quadratic, higher-degree polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic) and their graphs. Both an algebraic and graphical approach will be used to solve systems of equations and inequalities, and to investigate conic sections.

Elementary Functions - This course is a pre-calculus course. It consists of study of the basic functions that are used in a wide variety of college disciplines, with special emphasis on techniques and concepts that are important to calculus. Specifically, the following functions: linear, quadratic, rational, root, inverse, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric.

Math Honors - This course is designed for students who enjoy mathematics and would like to extend their knowledge of mathematics beyond standard class curriculum. The main goal for this class is to get students involved in local and national math competitions, teach them to promote mathematics at school and in the local community.

Math Lab - The purpose of this course is to help students whose prior knowledge does not line up with the TCP math curriculum. This is achieved by determining basic skills that are not yet developed, extra practice and help with homework.


English

Top

English 1-2 (Freshman English) - Freshman English is a required course and functions as an integral part in the freshman curriculum. The focus is on a broad range of language skills including: critical writing, analytical reading, oral presentations and grammar review. These skills are developed through the practice and implementation of the "Six Traits" and applied in various interdisciplinary projects that relate to freshman thematic units. The students will review the major themes in literature by reading both classical and modern works of literature.

English 3-4 (Sophomore English) - This course will build upon the skills taught in English 1-2. We will continue to develop the skills needed for writing, including working through the writing process and building strength in the 6-traits of writing through essays, short stories, poetry, and researched based writing. We will also study World and American Literature in the form of novels, memoirs, short stories, plays, poetry, and essays. Also during this course we will prepare for the Reading and Writing AIMS test, which are administered in late February.

English 3-4 - Honors Component - This course may be taken for honors credit. You have to complete all the requirements for English 3-4 plus additions in the curriculum based on higher level, critical thinking skills. These could include extension activities, additional essay questions, or additional requirements to projects and papers.

English 5-6 (Junior English) - This course will build upon the skills taught in English 3-4. During the first semester the primary focus is on the research paper and all the components of writing a research paper, which is a graduation requirement in the State of Arizona. We will also study American Literature, Shakespeare and begin basic speaking and presenting skills. In the second semester we will take a focus on speech, learning and performing different types of speeches including informative, demonstrative, impromptu, debate and persuasive. We will also continue to study American and World literature as well as work on creative writing skills.

English 5-6 - Honors Component - This course may be taken for honors credit. You have to complete all the requirements for English 5-6 plus additions in the curriculum based on higher level, critical thinking skills. These could include extension activities, additional essay questions, or additional requirements to projects and papers.

Shakespeare - Study of a representative selection of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies and histories. This course will cover the range of Shakespeare's career and the Elizabethan period. Students will research and critically analyze original Shakespearian texts and modern interpretations. Presentations will be written, oral and performance based.

Young Adult Literature - A study of the genre of literature written for, marketed to, and taught to young adults (primarily ages 12-17), examining relevant themes involved with such literature. Students will choose novels for independent study in addition to the class assigned reading. Completion of formal written assignments, oral presentations and participation in class discussions will be critical to student success in this course.

Honors English & National English Honor Society/ DeNobis - This course's main objective is to produce the school newspaper, DeNobis. This includes researching and writing articles, photography, editing, layout, bookkeeping, and advertising. We also have the activities of the National English Honor Society (NEHS). You do not have to be a member of NEHS to receive credit for this course but credit in this course does not mean automatic acceptance into NEHS, there is a separate application process for this distinction. A full year in this course is worth .5 elective credits.

Speech Communication - Students will learn the fundamentals of communication, including speaking as well as listening. Students will become familiar with the various components of a speech and make presentations to the class for personal experience. Students will study organizational patterns, research techniques, body language, self-evaluation, and presentation skills. Some emphasis will be placed on written communication specifically as it relates to journaling and speech outlines. Nonverbal communication and interpersonal communication will also be explored as they relate to the communication process.

Modern Rhetoric - (ENGL 1410), Dual credit course: 3 college credits; .5 high school credit, one semester course.
Prerequisite: Students must have completed three high school English credits (three years of English). This course is usually offered in the fall.
This foundational college-level composition course is designed to help students improve writing skills by combining extensive writing practice with a study of various forms of written discourse (exposition, narration, description, argumentation).

Introduction to Literature - (ENGL 1500) Dual credit course; 3 college credits; .5 high school credit, one semester course.
Prerequisite: Passing grade in Modern Rhetoric. This is NOT a 2nd semester composition class. Although it transfers as a Humanities course or elective course to other colleges, it may not transfer as an English composition course.
Introduction to the major genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. Designed for students with little or no background in college level literature. Recommended as preparation for other college literature courses.


Performing Arts

Top

Beginning String Orchestra - Pre-requisites: none
This is a performance-based course in which students learn to play a violin, viola, cello, or string bass. This class will focus on performance of beginning level concert repertoire throughout the semester. Music to be performed will be chosen by the teacher using criteria set by the National Standards for Music Education. Students will learn instrument set-up; playing posture; playing skills; note-reading skills; and concert etiquette, standards and expectations. This course curriculum follows the Orchestra standards from the Arizona Standards for Music Education.
Class lab fee $30 /year
Instrument rental: Students may rent from the school or a music store. (School instruments are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.) School instruments available for rental:
Violin/Viola: $50 per semester or $90 per school year
Cello: $70 per semester or $130 per school year

Beginning Concert Band - Pre-requisites: none
This is a performance-based course that teaches students to play brass, woodwind, or percussion instruments. This class will focus on performance of beginning level concert repertoire throughout the semester. Music to be performed will be chosen by the teacher using criteria set by the National Standards for Music Education. Students will learn instrument set-up; playing posture; playing skills; note-reading skills; and concert etiquette, standards and expectations. This course curriculum follows the Band standards from the Arizona Standards for Music Education.
Instruments include: flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, horn, percussion*
(* percussionist will learn wide variety of percussion family instruments including but not limited to piano, bells, triangle, wood block, drum, claves, etc.)
Class lab fee: $30/year
Instrument Rentals: the school has a very limited number of instruments and students are encouraged to rent their instruments from outside sources.

Advanced Chamber Orchestra - Pre-requisites: 1. One year of Beginning Strings/Band, audition, or consent of instructor 2. Proficient note reading skills
Instruments in the Chamber Orchestra include: strings (violin, viola, cello, string bass), brass (trumpet, trombone, baritone, tuba, horn) and woodwinds (flute, piccolo, clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, and oboe). Most of our music does not include parts for saxophone, guitar, or percussion. Students wishing to play those instruments may join the Improvisational Music club or the Beginning Concert Band.
Objective: This is a group performance-based course. This class will focus on performance of concert level repertoire throughout the semester. Music to be performed will be chosen by the teacher using criteria set by the National Standards for Music Education. Students will work on increasing technical playing skills; listening skills; sight-reading skills; explore music history; music advocacy; current issues is music; and concert etiquette, standards and expectations. This course curriculum follows the Orchestra/Band standards from the Arizona Standards for Music Education.
Class lab fee: $30/year

Choir - Pre-requisite: none
Objective: This course will seek to help individual students develop their singing voice through vocal training and breathing techniques, blending and pitch matching, singing harmonies, note reading, sight reading and sight singing, and performance of concert level repertoire from both solo and ensemble literature. Music to be performed will be chosen by the teacher using criteria set by the National Standards for Music Education. This course curriculum follows the Choral standards from the Arizona Standards for Music Education.
Class lab fee: $30/year

College Introduction to Music Literature - Credits: This is a 3-semester hour course that is a full year course (both Fall and Spring semesters)
Pre-requisite: sophomore standing or higher, or consent of instructor
Objective: This college course explores all aspects of music from its basic elements through its place in history. Students will learn basic piano playing technique, note/score reading, music history, and strengthen their aural listening skills.

2D Design A - This course is an introduction to the principals of black and white composition on a 2-dimensional plane. Coordinated sequence of studio projects and investigations of problems associated to spatial orientation as well as participation in gallery hours. No prerequisites are required.

2D Design A Honors - This course is a continued exploration of the principals of black and white composition on a 2-dimensional plane focusing directly on art as a means of communication. Coordinated sequence of studio projects, investigations of problems associated to spatial orientation, participation in gallery hours and four college level essays with oral presentations. Prerequisite: 2D Design or 3D Design. 2D Design B-This course is an introduction to the principals of color in composition on a 2-dimensional plane. Coordinated sequence of studio projects, investigations of problems associated to spatial orientation, participation in gallery hours. No prerequisites are required.

2D Design B Honors -This course is an introduction to the principals of color in composition on a 2-dimensional plane focusing directly on art as a means of communication. Coordinated sequence of studio projects, investigations of problems associated to spatial orientation, participation in gallery hours and four college level essays with oral presentations. Prerequisite: 2D Design or 3D Design. 3D Design -This course is an introduction to the principals of 3-dimensional space. Coordinated sequence of studio projects and investigations of problems associated to spatial organization as well as participation in gallery hours. No prerequisites are required.

3D Design Honors - This course is an introduction to the principals of 3-dimensional space focusing directly on art as a means of communication. Coordinated sequence of studio projects and investigations of problems associated to spatial organization as well as participation in gallery hours and four college level essays with oral presentations. Prerequisite: 2D Design or 3D Design. College credit is available for this course.

Art History Survey - Ancient to Renaissance -This course is a chronological study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Paleolithic area to the Renaissance. No prerequisites are required.

Art History Survey - Renaissance to Present -This course is a chronological study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to today.

Dance - This course is an introduction to dance as a fine art. We will study the history of ballet and modern dance and their connection to the major historical art movements since the Renaissance, appreciation and criticism of ballet and modern dance, dance physiology and kinesiology, an introduction to basic ballet and modern dance technique, exploring expression through movement, music theory as it relates to dance, an introduction to choreographic skills and performance.

Introduction to Theatre - (Fall) This course is designed to develop an appreciation and enjoyment of dramatic art and to foster an understanding of some of the basic principles which underlie theatre practice and theatre technique. Students should develop an appreciation for the work of the artists who help bring the playwrights pages to life as well as consider their contribution as members of an audience.

Introduction to Acting - (Spring) This course is designed for anyone of any level of expertise. If the student is a beginner to the world of theatre he/she will gain and practice new skills. It the student is an experienced theatre person, he/she can polish and perfect old learning. To accomplish this we will be learning various acting skills such as movement and voice, doing improvisation and pantomime, playing theatre games, working with Stanislavski's Method of Emotional Recall, studying character development, developing analysis abilities, and performing scenes. The student will also learn the terminology of acting and theatre. With this course I plan to help the student develop an appreciation of acting and theatre not only as an end unto itself, but also to help develop self-confidence, organizational, judgment, and analysis skills.


Foreign Language

Top

Japanese IA (Beginning) - Introduction to basic conversation patterns of Japanese stressing repetition, association and translation as learning techniques. Mastery of the alphabet system Hiragana

Japanese IB (Beginning) -Introduction to basic conversation patterns of Japanese stressing repetition, association and translation as learning techniques. Mastery of Hiragana and passive use of Katakana (the Japanese alphabet system) and Mastery of 75 Kanji

Japanese 2A (Intermediate) - Using the textbook Basic Japanese for Students, students will develop proficiency in the use of major sentence patterns and learning an additional 100 Kanji

Japanese 2B (Intermediate) - Using the textbook Basic Japanese for Students, students will develop proficiency in the use of major sentence patterns and learning an additional 150 Kanji

Spanish 1A & 1B - (Fall & Spring) Come to class ready to start speaking Spanish from the very first moments of class! Spanish 1 is a basic, thorough, introduction to the Spanish language -- focused on speaking, reading, and writing. This isn't your Grandma's Conversation Class! Get ready to learn the present tense including regular -ar/-er/-ir verbs, stem-changing verbs, and reflexive verbs, all presented around a variety of vocabulary themes including family & home, going shopping, numbers and colors, school life, the calendar & weather. There is lots of in class practice, group and pair activities, and at-home work to reinforce skills. The focus is hands-on activities to learn Spanish including writing and acting dialogs and skits.

Spanish 2A & 2B - (Fall & Spring) ¡Bienvenidos a España! In this class we'll be looking at how to actually put the Spanish language to use, including studying about Spain. The focus is hands-on activities to learn Spanish including researching and writing about Spain in a way that makes in class lessons immediately usable in real-world situations. Grammar will be more in depth focusing on direct and indirect object pronouns, the past tense, and commands (now you'll know how to boss around your friends in Spanish!) There is lots of in class practice, group and pair activities, and at-home work to reinforce skills.

Latin 1A & 1B - (Fall & Spring) Latin is the basis of many languages and the key to unlocking them. Latin 1 is a basic, thorough, introduction to the language -- focused on classical Latin. Come to class ready to learn! Course emphasis is on comprehension rather than grammar; repetition of controlled vocabulary and contextual clues used to read extensive passages of simple Latin.

Latin 2A & 2B - (Fall & Spring) Latin is the basis of many languages and the key to unlocking them. Latin 1 is a basic, thorough, introduction to the language -- focused on classical Latin. Come to class ready to learn!


Science

Top

Integrated Science - Integrated Science is a lab science course primarily designed to prepare incoming freshman with a foundational knowledge of the sciences. By developing a strong foundation in the sciences this course will help to prepare students for success in more advanced science courses offered at TCP. This course emphasizes the basic physical, chemical, and biological sciences and also integrates basic algebraic problem solving skills into the curriculum. Topics of study include: The Metric System, Classifying Matter, Unit Conversions, Basic Mechanics, Atoms, Isotopes, and Ions, Molecular and Ionic Compounds, Foundations of Biology.

Biology A - This is an introductory course that studies the basis of how living organisms are able to survive and interact. Topics of study include the nature and methods of biological science, similarities of life processes and cellular structure and function, the biochemical basis of life activities, diversity and classification of living things, and a comparison of the various systems of the human body to those of other organisms. Methods of learning will include lectures, audio-visual presentations, computer simulations, and classroom as well as laboratory exercises. A Science Fair project is required as part of the course.

Biology B - This is a course that builds on the studies done in the first semester. Topics include genetics, evolution, and ecology, and complete the preparation of students for the AIMS High School Science Test in the life sciences. Students will complete the semester by examining animal and human behavior with respect to how they interact with their environment. Honors Biology: Students taking Honors Biology will meet all of the requirements for High School Biology, but in addition will be required to do further study involving more problem solving and higher order thinking skills. A greater depth of understanding and more extensive work will apply to many of the homework assignments, class activities, laboratory investigations, and tests. College Environmental Biology - This course is an introduction to the study of the environment, including consideration of the normal structure and functioning of ecosystems, i.e., energy flow and cycling of materials. The roles of living organisms in the community, as well as their symbiotic relationships, will be considered. Man's role in the total schemes of the ecosystem will be considered, including the problems of exploitation of natural resources, pollution, human population growth, and food resources. The primary aim of this course is to provide non majors with a scientific understanding of the environment and man's role in the environment. Economic and social factors will also be discussed. This background will allow them to make educated decisions concerning the environment in their lives and the life of their community. Environmental Biology can be taken as a non-lab credit course or as a lab course. Students taking the lab oriented mode will meet one additional day per week and will become members of the Envirothon Team. Three Friday field/lab activities will be scheduled at the beginning of each semester and are required for successful completion of the lab course.

Chemistry - Chemistry is a lab science course designed to prepare upper classmen and sophomores for college level chemistry and science courses by exploring quantitative relationships between matter and energy. Topics of study include: Matter and Change, Chemical Reactions, The Behavior of Gasses, Thermochemistry, Bonding, and Acids and Bases. Students will perform lab experiments designed to explore these topics and develop basic lab skills.

Anatomy and Physiology A - This is a course that examines the structure and function of the human body in its normal state as well as the diseases and disorders that affect it. This first semester examines general body orientation and terminology, the chemical basis of life, cell structure, function and reproduction, cellular metabolism, and the integumentary, skeletal, articular, and muscular systems. Methods of learning will include lectures, audio-visual presentations, computer simulations, and classroom as well as laboratory exercises. Pre-requisite: High school biology, chemistry strongly recommended Anatomy and Physiology B - Pre-requisite: Anatomy and Physiology A This course builds on Anatomy and Physiology A by examining the nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. A report on our current understanding of a specific topic related to Anatomy and Physiology is required to be written as well as presented to the class. Honors Science - Honors Science will meet one day a week in the mornings and is designed to allow students to investigate advanced topics in physical, chemical, and biological science. Additionally, students will explore the history, philosophy, and nature of scientific inquiry and develop advanced lab skills necessary for preparing and performing experiments and demonstrations. Membership in the Science National Honor Society will require at least one year of enrollment in Honors Science.

Physics - The Classical Physics topics include: Scientific method and notation, Kinematics, Dynamics (Newton's Laws), Conservation of Energy, Conservation of Momentum, Heat and Thermodynamics, Wave Motion, Geometric and Physical Optics, Electricity and Magnetism
The Modern Physics topics can include: Special Relativity, Atomic Theory, Nuclear Physics, Quantum Mechanics

College Biology A - Students in this course will study the history and nature of biology as a science, the unifying concepts in biology, the chemical and cellular basis of life, cellular metabolism and classical genetics. Methods of learning will include lectures, audio-visual presentations, computer simulations, and classroom as well as laboratory exercises. Pre-requisite: High school biology, chemistry strongly recommended

College Biology B - Pre-requisite: College Biology A Students completing this semester will receives 4 semester hours of credit at Graceland University.
This is a continuation of College Biology A, including the molecular basis of heredity and genetic engineering, evolution, and ecology. Independent study will allow students to delve more deeply into topics studied earlier in the course.


Electives

Top

Anthropology - The description and analysis of culture including modern urban sub-cultures. The study of pre-literate and non-literate cultures of various levels of complexity through their material remains. We will place special emphasis on the pre-historic cultures of the southwestern United States with field trips to regional archaeological sites. The study of human osteology and hereditary variation in contemporary human populations, human origins and early man. The origins and evolution of language and its relationship to culture. Utilizing the data gathered in the other four disciplines to generate practical solutions to problems found in modern society.

CTE300-Introduction to Networking Technology Dual credit class (YC CNT100)
Three credit hour, college; .5 credit hour, high school
Introduction to technologies, terminology, and skills used in the world of data networking. Emphasis on practical applications of networking and computer technology to real-world problems, including home and small-business network setup.

CTE310-A+ Computer Technician Certification Dual credit class (YC CNT110)
Four credit hours, college; .5 credit hour, high school
Install, configure, support, and troubleshoot personal computers. Emphasis on PC hardware, and installation, operation, and upgrade procedures. Focus on practical networking in a PC environment along with server hardware maintenance and troubleshooting. Preparation for the Comp TIA A+ Certification exam. This course, with CNT 120, prepares the learner for the Comp/TIA Server+ Certification Exam. Preparedness recommendations: Experience using a computer keyboard and accessing the Internet with a web browser.

CTE315-Network+: Networking Technologies Certification Dual credit class (YC CNT115)
Four credit hours, college; .5 credit hour, high school
A broad range of networking technologies is examined. Topics include network media, topologies, protocols, operating systems, network management, and security. Preparation for the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

CTE320-Exploring Network Operating Environments Dual credit class (YC CNT120)
Three credit hours, college; .5 credit hour, high school
A broad range of networking technologies is examined. Topics include network media, topologies, protocols, operating systems, network management, and security. Preparation for the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

Introductory Psychology - Dual credit class (GL PSYC1300)
Three credit hours, college; .5 credit hour, high school.
Although this is an elective at Tri-City College Prep H.S., it is considered a social / behavioral science at colleges and universities, and transfers as such. Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. Introduction to Psychology This introduction to psychology covers a broad range of topics including learning processes, the development of personality, mental and emotional problems, the psychology of group behavior and social attitudes. Studying these topics helps students develop an awareness and understanding of the many forces that influence their behavior.

Religions of the World - Offered for college credit or high school credit
An upper division semester course designed as an introduction to the thought, practice, and history of six major religions that have impacted the world: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism Buddhism, and Sikhism. We will examine their origins, history, theology, worship and practices. Using a phenomenological approach, we will seek to understand each faith from an objective academic perspective. The focus of the course is to digest the faith's doctrines, not to evaluate its theological merits.

Rowing - Rowing is an athletic course that will provide strength and stamina training as well as teach you the skills of competitive rowing. Tri-City College Prep Crew has a yearlong season. Weather permitting; we practice twice weekly on Watson Lake and twice a week on campus. This is a team sport but there are positions for true leaders in the sport. We compete in regattas down on Tempe Town Lake, usually 3 times a year. As our program grows so does our opportunities. This is why this course is not just based on athletics but also on fundraising and community events that every crew member must participate in. A full year in this course is worth 1 rowing elective credit.

TA (Teacher's Assistant) - Student is responsible for helping out a teacher with varying tasks. Individual responsibilities will vary from teacher to teacher. A TA is expected to be in class on time every day and should ask the teacher before class starts how they can help. This is a pass/fail course and any student who doesn't meet expectations will fail. If a TA has finished all the tasks a teacher has assigned he/she should stay in the class and not leave. This course is meant for responsible and self motivated juniors and seniors.
Tri-City College Prep High School
5522 Side Road Prescott, Arizona 86301
Phone: 928-777-0403 Fax: 928-777-0402